harrypotterconfessions:

To me, Fred and George always embodied every quality that made a true Gryffindor: they were always daring with their pranks and behaviour, they showed real nerve, abandoning education to pursue their own dreams, they were part of the brave that returned to Hogwarts to fight Voldemort, and then George proved their bravery, living on despite having lost a whole half of himself and continuing with the dream they had both shared.

harrypotterconfessions:

To me, Fred and George always embodied every quality that made a true Gryffindor: they were always daring with their pranks and behaviour, they showed real nerve, abandoning education to pursue their own dreams, they were part of the brave that returned to Hogwarts to fight Voldemort, and then George proved their bravery, living on despite having lost a whole half of himself and continuing with the dream they had both shared.

moonlightning:

draconian-idealism:

To be completely honest, I do agree with this to some degree. I think Gryffindor deserved that House Cup because its members all learned very important lessons their first year and they did save the school, after all, but… this doesn’t sit right with me. I always cheer when they win because I do want them to, but it’s one of those rare moments in the books where Jo seems to show that doing good needs to be rewarded in some way. I love how the scene is written, I just always wish that they hadn’t told Slytherin (or us) they’d won in the first place. Then nothing about this would bother me in the slightest. Regardless, the way she wrote everything had a reason, and I’m 110% accepting of that. 

But she never did write that the Slytherins have already won, she just described to us how the Great Hall was decorated during the time of the year-end feast. I imagined that it just so happens that other professors already “set-up” the place before Dumbledore could’ve mentioned it to them that he’d be awarding points to the Trio and Neville. Or a better idea would be that by ~~magic~~, at exactly (insert time before the feast), the Great Hall will bear the colors of the house who has the most number of points in their hourglass. Besides, he needed to explain first to the whole school and us readers why Gryffindor wins.  Giving the three 50 points while only giving Neville 10 was the one that showed more bias, in my opinion.
Which brings me to my second point. As much as I agree that not all good deeds should be rewarded in such a grand scale, I believe this is one of the many instances that you actually can. As many (and even you) already pointed out, they stopped Voldemort and saved the school. That’s not something you come across everyday. It’s not like Harry, Ron and Hermione just accidentally found a Galleon and decided to give it back to Dumbles coz, you know, someone might own it. But I do believe in giving fair/equal rewards to everyone involved which to me, Neville was a part of. So if it were me, I would’ve given 50 points as well to Neville or would’ve given the three only 10 points each as well or ya know, any random number for as long as they all receive the same amount of points. :)

moonlightning:

draconian-idealism:

To be completely honest, I do agree with this to some degree. I think Gryffindor deserved that House Cup because its members all learned very important lessons their first year and they did save the school, after all, but… this doesn’t sit right with me. I always cheer when they win because I do want them to, but it’s one of those rare moments in the books where Jo seems to show that doing good needs to be rewarded in some way. I love how the scene is written, I just always wish that they hadn’t told Slytherin (or us) they’d won in the first place. Then nothing about this would bother me in the slightest. Regardless, the way she wrote everything had a reason, and I’m 110% accepting of that. 

But she never did write that the Slytherins have already won, she just described to us how the Great Hall was decorated during the time of the year-end feast. I imagined that it just so happens that other professors already “set-up” the place before Dumbledore could’ve mentioned it to them that he’d be awarding points to the Trio and Neville. Or a better idea would be that by ~~magic~~, at exactly (insert time before the feast), the Great Hall will bear the colors of the house who has the most number of points in their hourglass. Besides, he needed to explain first to the whole school and us readers why Gryffindor wins.  Giving the three 50 points while only giving Neville 10 was the one that showed more bias, in my opinion.

Which brings me to my second point. As much as I agree that not all good deeds should be rewarded in such a grand scale, I believe this is one of the many instances that you actually can. As many (and even you) already pointed out, they stopped Voldemort and saved the school. That’s not something you come across everyday. It’s not like Harry, Ron and Hermione just accidentally found a Galleon and decided to give it back to Dumbles coz, you know, someone might own it. But I do believe in giving fair/equal rewards to everyone involved which to me, Neville was a part of. So if it were me, I would’ve given 50 points as well to Neville or would’ve given the three only 10 points each as well or ya know, any random number for as long as they all receive the same amount of points. :)

gryffindorbaddie:

thirsting-for-more:

harrypotterconfessions:

graphic submitted

Um. No. I think I’d give up my selfish wants if my family needed me.

Except he wasn’t LOL.
This explains everything you need to know.
And so you can’t avoid it:
“1. Bringing in your personal experiences into the matter does not   instantly make you qualified to judge Percy’s situation. It also deters   people from trying to argue with you because they don’t want to start   mucking around in your affairs and offend you. The circumstances in   which Percy left his family are vastly different from the ones you’ve   described.
2. Percy is a man of strong convictions. That is something in itself   to be admired. He did what he truly believed to be right. It was not   that he wanted to abandon his family. He allied himself with the   Ministry because he was under the impression that the Ministry could not   be wrong. The Ministry had always been pillar of strength and safety  in  the wizarding community, many people put their faith into it.  (People  seem to fail to realize that the Ministry itself is not an evil  place.  It’s political. Politics are tricky business. There are some  good  politicians, there are some crooked ones, and every last one of  them  tries to bend the truth, word things to glorify themselves and  stay out  of sticky situations. So there will always be some good and  bad there,  but that’s the people who are a part of it, and it was not  truly evil or  wholly wrong until it became corrupted by Voldemort’s  Death Eaters.)  His parents had often sung fairly high praises of it.  His father worked  there. His mother urged her children to do the same.
3. Percy realized his mistake early on, but was too ashamed to apologize.
4. Percy must have been considerably upset when his father suggested   that he had only gotten a promotion because Fudge wanted to place a spy   within the Weasley family. He must have taken it as an insult that he   could not achieve a promotion on his own merit, which most likely   provoked many of the nasty things he said.
5. Percy did of course want to be successful, I will not deny that   one bit. He is a very ambitious person. He did not, however, want to   abandon his family. He did it because he felt they were wrongly   criticizing him and he expected that he would be right and they would   apologize to him and things would be fine. He did not leave because he   wanted to be rid of them. He left because he had been under the   impression they would always support him in anything he chose, anything   he thought, and when he was met with the opposite of what he had   expected he took it as his cue to leave.
6. While he is a very intelligent person, he was still very naive.   Book smarts only get you so far. He still had some growing up to do, and   he made a mistake. Everyone makes mistakes. Everyone gets into   arguments with their parents and say things that they do not mean or   regret terribly later on. It may take a while to apologize, to realize   the error of our ways — but that’s the point. Percy did apologize, he   realized he was wrong. He realized what he did was wrong and the   incredible value of his family. Everyone makes mistakes — this was his.   And he learned from it. He is a good person.
7. Everyone always disregards all the wonderful things he did prior   to his estrangement from his family. He was a good son, a good brother.   He was obedient, he cared deeply for his siblings and though they saw   him as a stick in the mud he was always, first and foremost, looking out   for their best interests. He is often described chasing after them  like  a ‘mother hen after her chicks’. He wants to care for them, keep  them  out of trouble, set a good example for them, be their role model,   someone they admire. He loves them dearly. A particular scene left a   deep impact on me. It’s in the Goblet Of Fire, where Percy is described   as looking “very white and somehow much younger than usual” when Ron   emerges from the water. He rushes out to meet him. He runs into the   freezing cold water in his clothes, to rescue his little brother. He   dotes on him and fusses over him to the point where Ron starts whining.   Percy is very high strung and emotional; he easily angers but he just  as  easily frets, worries, and panics.” -Housewareshero

gryffindorbaddie:

thirsting-for-more:

harrypotterconfessions:

graphic submitted

Um. No. I think I’d give up my selfish wants if my family needed me.

Except he wasn’t LOL.

This explains everything you need to know.

And so you can’t avoid it:

“1. Bringing in your personal experiences into the matter does not instantly make you qualified to judge Percy’s situation. It also deters people from trying to argue with you because they don’t want to start mucking around in your affairs and offend you. The circumstances in which Percy left his family are vastly different from the ones you’ve described.

2. Percy is a man of strong convictions. That is something in itself to be admired. He did what he truly believed to be right. It was not that he wanted to abandon his family. He allied himself with the Ministry because he was under the impression that the Ministry could not be wrong. The Ministry had always been pillar of strength and safety in the wizarding community, many people put their faith into it. (People seem to fail to realize that the Ministry itself is not an evil place. It’s political. Politics are tricky business. There are some good politicians, there are some crooked ones, and every last one of them tries to bend the truth, word things to glorify themselves and stay out of sticky situations. So there will always be some good and bad there, but that’s the people who are a part of it, and it was not truly evil or wholly wrong until it became corrupted by Voldemort’s Death Eaters.) His parents had often sung fairly high praises of it. His father worked there. His mother urged her children to do the same.

3. Percy realized his mistake early on, but was too ashamed to apologize.

4. Percy must have been considerably upset when his father suggested that he had only gotten a promotion because Fudge wanted to place a spy within the Weasley family. He must have taken it as an insult that he could not achieve a promotion on his own merit, which most likely provoked many of the nasty things he said.

5. Percy did of course want to be successful, I will not deny that one bit. He is a very ambitious person. He did not, however, want to abandon his family. He did it because he felt they were wrongly criticizing him and he expected that he would be right and they would apologize to him and things would be fine. He did not leave because he wanted to be rid of them. He left because he had been under the impression they would always support him in anything he chose, anything he thought, and when he was met with the opposite of what he had expected he took it as his cue to leave.

6. While he is a very intelligent person, he was still very naive. Book smarts only get you so far. He still had some growing up to do, and he made a mistake. Everyone makes mistakes. Everyone gets into arguments with their parents and say things that they do not mean or regret terribly later on. It may take a while to apologize, to realize the error of our ways — but that’s the point. Percy did apologize, he realized he was wrong. He realized what he did was wrong and the incredible value of his family. Everyone makes mistakes — this was his. And he learned from it. He is a good person.

7. Everyone always disregards all the wonderful things he did prior to his estrangement from his family. He was a good son, a good brother. He was obedient, he cared deeply for his siblings and though they saw him as a stick in the mud he was always, first and foremost, looking out for their best interests. He is often described chasing after them like a ‘mother hen after her chicks’. He wants to care for them, keep them out of trouble, set a good example for them, be their role model, someone they admire. He loves them dearly. A particular scene left a deep impact on me. It’s in the Goblet Of Fire, where Percy is described as looking “very white and somehow much younger than usual” when Ron emerges from the water. He rushes out to meet him. He runs into the freezing cold water in his clothes, to rescue his little brother. He dotes on him and fusses over him to the point where Ron starts whining. Percy is very high strung and emotional; he easily angers but he just as easily frets, worries, and panics.” -Housewareshero

playoninfiniterepeat:

Here’s what I don’t get: people complain that Harry/Ginny came out of nowhere then some complain that Ron/Hermione’s relationship is just too weird because they’ve known each other since they were 11 (which can also apply to Harry/Hermione). Others think the idea of Draco/Hermione is just plain wrong yet they support Drarry. Then there are those who hate the idea of George and Angelina getting together but the same people would encourage Fred/George.
I have nothing against non-canon ships but for Merlin’s sake, at least try to be consistent when you reason out why you like or don’t like certain ships.

ENCOURAGE WHAT?! O_O

playoninfiniterepeat:

Here’s what I don’t get: people complain that Harry/Ginny came out of nowhere then some complain that Ron/Hermione’s relationship is just too weird because they’ve known each other since they were 11 (which can also apply to Harry/Hermione). Others think the idea of Draco/Hermione is just plain wrong yet they support Drarry. Then there are those who hate the idea of George and Angelina getting together but the same people would encourage Fred/George.

I have nothing against non-canon ships but for Merlin’s sake, at least try to be consistent when you reason out why you like or don’t like certain ships.

ENCOURAGE WHAT?! O_O

But at least Peeves never discriminated. Pureblood, Half-blood or Muggleborn— he’s never choosy on who to play tricks on. ;)

But at least Peeves never discriminated. Pureblood, Half-blood or Muggleborn— he’s never choosy on who to play tricks on. ;)

playoninfiniterepeat:

THIS! Plus I always thought there’d be more to Mrs. Norris— well there is but I won’t spoil it for those who haven’t accessed Pottermore but still, I thought it’d be more than that— like she was his lover before then something happened, transfiguration gone wrong perhaps or she was trying to become an animagus but got stuck in her animal form. I dunno… I just feel bad for Filch. The Wizarding World doesn’t really care much for Squibs and he, like anyone else, just wanted to fit in.

Meh, now I feel bad for treating Filch badly… =/

playoninfiniterepeat:

THIS! Plus I always thought there’d be more to Mrs. Norris— well there is but I won’t spoil it for those who haven’t accessed Pottermore but still, I thought it’d be more than that— like she was his lover before then something happened, transfiguration gone wrong perhaps or she was trying to become an animagus but got stuck in her animal form. I dunno… I just feel bad for Filch. The Wizarding World doesn’t really care much for Squibs and he, like anyone else, just wanted to fit in.

Meh, now I feel bad for treating Filch badly… =/

I don’t think it’s fair for people to wish Percy dead instead of Fred. I mean, yeah, he can still be a prat sometimes but he is still my brother, my family. He realised he was wrong, apologized for his behaviour, and came back and fought beside us. He was there when we needed him the most and we will always love him for that.
As much as I want Fred to be alive, I do not wish any of my other brothers or sister to be dead.

I don’t think it’s fair for people to wish Percy dead instead of Fred. I mean, yeah, he can still be a prat sometimes but he is still my brother, my family. He realised he was wrong, apologized for his behaviour, and came back and fought beside us. He was there when we needed him the most and we will always love him for that.

As much as I want Fred to be alive, I do not wish any of my other brothers or sister to be dead.